Entertainment

Top facts about Autism after Prison breaks’ Wentworth Miller’s diagnosis

Wentworth Earl Miller III is an American and British actor and screenwriter. He rose to prominence following his starring role as Michael Scofield in the Fox series Prison Break, for which he received a nomination for the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Television Series Drama in 2005.

The Actor, shared that he was diagnosed with autism last year, telling his followers, “being autistic is central to who I am”. The 49, revealed on Instagram that he was diagnosed with autism as an adult last year, telling his followers, “This isn’t something I’d change … immediately being autistic is central to who I am. To everything I’ve achieved/articulated.” 

Miller wrote, “This fall marks 1 year since I received my informal autism diagnosis. Preceded by a self-diagnosis. Followed by a formal diagnosis. It was a long, flawed process in need of updating. IMO. I’m a middle-aged man. Not a 5-year-old.” 

Miller noted that “access to a diagnosis is a privilege many do not enjoy,” admitting that his diagnosis was “a shock,” but “not a surprise.” 

autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as “a broad range of conditions characterized by challenges with social skills, repetitive behaviors, speech and nonverbal communication.” but here are the top facts about Autism brought to you by the World Health Organisation..

Key facts

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a diverse group of conditions. Characteristics of autism may be detected in early childhood, but autism is often not diagnosed until much later.

About one in 160 children has an ASD(1).

The abilities and needs of people with autism vary and can evolve over time. While some people with autism can live independently, others have severe disabilities and require life-long care and support.

Evidence-based psychosocial interventions can improve communication and social skills, with a positive impact on the well-being and quality of life of people with autism and also their caregivers.

People with autism are often subject to stigma, discrimination and human rights violations.

Care for people with autism needs to be accompanied by actions at community and societal levels for greater accessibility, inclusivity and support.

Causes

Available scientific evidence suggests that there are probably many factors that make a child more likely to have an ASD, including environmental and genetic factors.

Available epidemiological data conclude that there is no evidence of a causal association between measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, and ASD. Previous studies suggesting a causal link were found to be filled with methodological flaws(2)(3).

There is also no evidence to suggest that any other childhood vaccine may increase the risk of ASD. Evidence reviews of the potential association between the preservative thiomersal and aluminium adjuvants contained in inactivated vaccines and the risk of ASD strongly concluded that vaccines do not increase the risk of ASD.

Human rights

All people, including people with autism, have the right to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health.

And yet, people with autism are often subject to stigma and discrimination, including unjust deprivation of health care, education and opportunities to engage and participate in their communities.

People with autism have the same health problems as the general population. However, they may, in addition, have specific health-care needs related to ASD or other co-occurring conditions. They may be more vulnerable to developing chronic noncommunicable conditions because of behavioural risk factors such as physical inactivity and poor dietary preferences, and are at greater risk of violence, injury and abuse.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*